Introduction

In colder climates, eating locally through the winter can be downright challenging. But we’re here with some good news: Every meal doesn’t have to revolve around potatoes and onions until April. With a bit of advanced planning and creativity, it’s possible to eat fresh fruits and vegetables with plenty of nutrients and flavor all winter long. Below are the fruit and vegetables l would recomend introducing into your daily intake during the winter months.

1. Pomegranates
Chances are you’ve tasted pomegranates in their newly popular juice form. And from a heart-health perspective, that’s probably a good thing. Pomegranate juice is rich in antioxidants (more so than other fruit juices)—just a cup daily might help to keep free radicals from oxidizing “bad” LDL cholesterol. LDL contributes to plaque buildup in the arteries. Another study showed that drinking pomegranate juice might improve blood flow to the heart in people with myocardial ischemia, a serious condition in which the heart’s oxygen supply is compromised because the arteries leading to it are blocked.

2. Dark Leafy Greens
Dark leafy greens, such as kale, broccoli and cabbage thrive in the chill of winter when the rest of the produce section looks bleak. In fact, a frost can take away the bitterness of kale. These greens are particularly rich in vitamins A, C and K which is great for women especially who are child bearing.

3. Citrus
Citrus fruits, including lemons, limes, oranges and grapefruit, are at their juiciest in the wintertime and can add sunshine to the dreary winter. Citrus fruits are loaded with vitamin C—one medium orange delivers more than 100 percent of your daily dose. Citrus fruits are also rich sources of flavonoids. The predominant flavonoid in these fruitS actually helps boasts “good” HDL cholesterol and lowering “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

4. Winter Squash
There are many varieties of winter squash and they are all excellent choices in the winter. One cup of cooked winter squash has few calories (around 80) but is high in both vitamin which can give you up to 33% of your RDA, as well as being a good source of vitamins B6 and K, potassium and folate.

5.Onions
Ideal for flavoring anything from soup, to grain salads, to pasta, to meat, onions are a year-round kitchen all-star. They might make you cry, but onions are actually pretty healthy . The unassuming veggies are low in calories but surprisingly high in vitamin C and fiber. The oils found in onions can lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol

6.Beetroot
Sweet, earthy, and deep red, beets are pretty unique in the vegetable aisle. Beets contain antioxidants called betalains, which can help fight cancer and other degenerative diseases . They’re also rich in vitamins A, B, C as well as potassium and folate . They’re also a natural source of sugar (about nine grams per serving), so those looking to cut down on sweet stuff should take note.

7.Sweet Potatoes
Sweet potatoes might win the award for “Most Versatile Tuber.” These orange-hued delights are loaded with fiber, beta-carotene, vitamins A and C, and antioxidants. Plus, since they’re fairly low on the glycemic index, they’re great for filling up without getting weighed down.

8. Carrots
These are loaded with the antioxidant beta-carotene, a compound that converts to vitamin A in the body . Vitamin A is essential for a strong immune system and healthy eyes, skin, and mucus membranes. The orange veggies are also loaded with vitamin C, cyanidins, and lutein, which are all antioxidants. Some studies show that eating carrots can reduce risk of cancer and even prevent cardiovascular disease.

For more information on nutrition or food plans please email rich@121fitnesstraining.co.uk