Introduction

It is highly recommended that adults and children reduce their sugar intake to less than 10% of total calorie consumption. But there’s more to it than just banning sweets, fizzy drinks, and cake from your diet and skipping sweetener in your coffee. Women should consume no more than 6 teaspoons (25 grams) of sweetener per day and men no more than 9 teaspoons (38 grams) also just because you don’t add sugar to food you may think you’re in the clear, but on average, most of us consume as much as 20 teaspoons of sweetener per day. A huge amount of empty calories that can lead to weight gain and increase your risk of disease, so how can you avoid this? One way is if sugar appears in the top 3 ingredients on a food label leave that item on the shelf!

To keep your sugar levels down try and avoid these items on your shopping list!

1) Yoghurt with fruit

Shouldn’t yogurt be on the “good” foods list? Well, it is — but the varieties with added fruit on the bottom usually contain a high amount of sugar — up to a whopping 19 grams per cup. A much better choice: Opt for plain yogurt and add your own sliced fruit, plus a drop of honey for an all-natural sweetener.

2) Canned soup

You’ve heard about canned soups being high in sodium, but did you know it’s also chock full of sugar also. It’s true: Sugar is added as a preservative to many canned soups to extend their shelf life — and you can find up to 15 grams of sugar per 1.5 cups in certain varieties, so check labels carefully before you buy.

3) Salad dressing

Dressing is one of the biggest ways a seemingly-healthy salad can go from health food to diet buster in seconds, with some dressings containing up to 4 grams per tablespoon of dressing. Pay particular attention to light or fat-free varieties, which use sugar to make up for the flavor lost by cutting out fat. Your best bet? Eat your salad with a light and easy dressing made from a dash of olive oil and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice instead.

4) Tomato Sauce

Store-bought tomato sauces in jars are convenient — but can be sneaky sources of sugar, as it’s often added to cut the acidic taste of tomatoes and to keep jarred sauces fresh for a longer period. You might find up to 12 grams hiding in a half-cup (though it may be called “corn syrup” in the ingredient list).

5) Bread

Sugar can sneak up on you in bread, with some varieties containing up to 2 grams of sugar per slice (and that includes some brands of whole wheat bread). But you don’t have to give up having sandwiches; just look for breads with little or no added sugar, and whole wheat flour listed in the ingredients.

6) Granola Bars

Granola bars sound a lot healthier than they actually are; some brands contain up to 9 grams of sugar per bar, and you’re likely to find unhealthy enriched white flour and corn syrup in the ingredient list. Look for bars that contain less than 35 percent calories from sugar, or consider snacking on a piece of fruit and a handful of whole nuts instead.

7) Dried Fruit

Dried fruit tends to sound a lot healthier than it is. Just a handful of dried cranberries, for instance, can contain up to 29 grams of sugar. Play it safe: Look for all-natural options that list only the fruit as the ingredient and no added sugars. Since those can be difficult to find, make it your general rule of thumb to opt for the whole fruit whenever you can.

8) Orange Juice

This breakfast favorite doesn’t contain added sugars, but you can find up to 9 grams of sugar in one glass of orange juice — almost as much as a glass of soda! Its actually better to eat a whole orange instead, to get the added benefit of dietary fiber; studies also show that choosing whole fruits, like apples and grapes, over their juice counterparts can help lower the risk for type 2 diabetes.

For more information on food plans for weight loss please email rich@121fitnesstraining.co.uk